Interview with Dan Manley on WMST in Mt. Sterling, KY

I recently spoke to Dan Manley on WMST’s Mornings on Main about my book HOW TO HOST A GAME NIGHT, the Green Bay Packers, The Rifleman board game, and much more!

Our discussion, which lasted nearly a full hour, was great fun. WMST (1150 AM and 106.9 FM) is located in Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, about 40 minutes east of Lexington.

You can listen to the entire discussion right here:

HOW TO HOST A GAME NIGHT is available now! Alan R. Moon, designer of Ticket to Ride, calls it “the ultimate guide to gaming” and says it “perfectly describes what makes the world of gaming the special place it is for so many people.” Order your copy (paperback or ebook) now!

Talking About Game Nights on WGVU in Grand Rapids

I recently spoke to WGVU-FM, the NPR affiliate in Grand Rapids, Michigan, about game nights, virtual game nights, and all sorts of board games.

You can listen to the interview (about 7 minutes long) right here.

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My book HOW TO HOST A GAME NIGHT is available now! Alan R. Moon, designer of Ticket to Ride, calls it “the ultimate guide to gaming” and says it “perfectly describes what makes the world of gaming the special place it is for so many people.” Order your copy (paperback or ebook) now!

NY Times: Host a Multigenerational Game Night

A recent article in The New York Times by Alexis Soloski (“Host a Multigenerational Game Night This Thanksgiving”) includes a lot of great tips for any family game night.

Here are the first two paragraphs:

Monopoly takes forever. Candy Land is dull, Chutes and Ladders preachy, the Game of Life troubling in its implications. So even as parents scramble for offscreen entertainment over the holidays, the prospect of a family game night may drive them to despair.

Some good news: We are living through a 24-karat golden age of tabletop games, an amusement Renaissance that sees thousands of board games published every year, in a dizzying array of story, strategy and design. How to pick a game that will delight the youngest players without boring older ones silly?

Alexis goes on to discuss specific game recommendations, tips for making game night a wonderful experience instead of one that people dread, and more!

Among the people she interviewed for the story (in addition to me) are Nick Fortugno, chief creative officer at Playmatics, and Jon Freeman, the owner of The Brooklyn Strategist.

It’s always fantastic to see the board game hobby get coverage in outlets like The New York Times, and even better when it’s a well-written article by someone who obviously enjoys playing games!

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My book HOW TO HOST A GAME NIGHT is available now! Alan R. Moon, designer of Ticket to Ride, calls it “the ultimate guide to gaming” and says it “perfectly describes what makes the world of gaming the special place it is for so many people.” Order your copy (paperback or ebook) now!

Interview with Ray Carr on WCSB-FM

I recently spoke to Ray Carr on The Ray Carr Show, which airs on WCSB-FM in Cleveland, about my book HOW TO HOST A GAME NIGHT, classic board games, and much more!

The interview was tremendously fun. Ray’s a terrific host (he’s been described as “the Larry King of Cleveland media” by the Cleveland Plain Dealer) and we covered a lot of topics in a short time.

You can listen to the interview right here. It starts at 1:25:33 into this MP3 (although the entire two-hour show is well worth listening to):

HOW TO HOST A GAME NIGHT is available now! Alan R. Moon, designer of Ticket to Ride, calls it “the ultimate guide to gaming” and says it “perfectly describes what makes the world of gaming the special place it is for so many people.” Order your copy (paperback or ebook) now!

Talking About Board Games with Julie Rose on Top of Mind

Earlier this week, I had the pleasure of talking to Julie Rose on the podcast / radio show Top of Mind about board games, the pandemic, the board game Pandemic, and many other game-related topics.

Listen to our conversation here.

We spoke about why tabletop games are so popular today, why Cheetos are a terrible game-night snack, and so much more! It was a really fun discussion.

Related: Julie is a terrific interviewer and I’ve added Top of Mind — which covers a wide range of topics — to my podcast subscriptions. (Search for “Top of Mind with Julie Rose” to find it in your podcast app!)

Discussing Catan on NPR

There’s a lot of anecdotal evidence that the pandemic — which is causing many more people to stay at home much more often — has led to increased sales of board games and jigsaw puzzles. In this report from NPR, reporter Rob Schmitz looks specifically at the modern classic Catan (aka Settlers of Catan).

Rob talked to me for the story and some of my comments are included. When he asked about the impact Catan has had on boardgaming, I gushed (if my recollection is correct) even a little more than is included in the final report.

It’s difficult to overestimate, in my view, the influence Catan has had on the design of modern board games. You can’t draw a straight line from every game back to Catan, of course, but that’s also part of its influence. It broke the mold, and was wildly successful doing so. That helped inspire other designers and publishers to take more risks, to be more creative.

We’re all treated to a much richer selection of tabletop games today because of Catan.

You can listen to Rob’s story below, or on NPR’s website (where a transcript is also available).

Interviewed by the Lebanon Daily News

Years ago… well, decades ago, I was a reporter for the Lebanon (PA) Daily News. I covered the courthouse and politics and whatever else I was assigned. (My boss, editor Paul Baker, once had to remind me — strongly remind me — that my job included covering stories that were somewhat less interesting than a murder trial. He was, needless to say, correct.)

So I’m particularly excited to be interviewed in the LDN about my crime writing.

I talked to Les Stewart — a reporter straight out of Central Casting, and a reporter who taught me a lot during my time there — about my short story collection THE THROES OF CRIME, the Lebanon County roots of the story “The Murder of Ernest Trapnell,” playing board games, and much more.

Interviewed in The Interrogation Room

Waiting to be ForgottenTom Leins recently interviewed me in his Interrogation Room about my contribution to the anthology WAITING TO BE FORGOTTEN: Stories of Crime and Heartbreak Inspired by The Replacements.

You can read the interview here.

The collection, published by Gutter Books and edited by Jay Stringer, includes 25 stories by David Accampo, Hailey Ardell, Gorman Bechard, Eric Beetner, Kristi Belcamino, Jerry Bloomfield, William Boyle, Angel Luis Colón, Jen Conley, Rory Costello, Josh Flanagan, Ed Kurtz, S.W. Lauden, Tom Leins, Mike McCrary, Franz Nicolay, Rick Ollerman, Eyre Price, Manuel Royal, Alex Segura, Johnny Shaw, Josh Stallings, Jay Stringer, Liam Sweeney, and me. (Easy to see why I’m pumped to be included, right?)

My story, “Election Day,” is about a television news reporter whose past catches up with her in an unexpected way. I hope you like it.

Audio versions of “Election Day” and S.W. Lauden’s story “Customer” are available on the Title 18: Word Crimes podcast, or you can listen right here.

Listen:

Download:
“Customer” by S.W. Lauden and “Election Day” by Erik Arneson on the Title 18: Word Crimes Podcast

Interviewed by Spinetingler Mag

the-throes-of-crime-finalSandra Ruttan at Spinetingler Magazine recently took some time to ask me a few questions about my short story collection THE THROES OF CRIME, my adventures in play-by-mail professional wrestling simulations, fleeing the country, and much more!

Read the entire interview here.

Huge thanks to Sandra and Spinetingler for inviting me to answer!